Tag Archives: Christ the King

Christ is our King! Catholic Inspiration

Mass Readings – The Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe

He is our creator, our savior, our judge and our friend.  In simple and unassuming ways, he will meet us in our struggles through this life with the courage and conviction to continue in the toughest of times.  As our king he deserves our allegiance; yet he lays down his life that we might be saved.  We owe everything to Jesus Christ, our King!

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Archive of Fr. Andrew’s Podcasts

Photo Credit: The Passion of the Christ, 2004.


The Solemnity of Christ the King

Study: Recall a time when you recognized God as the center of your life; a time when you hung on to faith – perhaps because other things were struggling.

Pray: Call upon the Lord to rule and guide your heart.

Serve:  What is the King’s command for you today?  How is the Lord directing you to help and serve another?

Mass Readings – The Solemnity of our Lord Jesus Christ, the King of the Universe

This weekend brings the Church liturgical year to a close.  Next week begins Advent, and we will start a new liturgical year with the cycle of “B” readings in the Lectionary for Mass.

Why do we end the year with the notion of Christ the King?  Why do we place this feast here?  What’s the point?

The feast has several levels of meaning.  By calling Christ our King we are making a statement that Jesus is the Lord of our lives.  It means that we place Christ first, and that we serve the Lord Jesus with the allegiance of our hearts, minds, and bodies.  We belong to Christ, who rules us.

In addition, to claim Christ as our King means that we are members of his kingdom.  Through our baptism we are called to the community of faith, the Church, and we possess an inheritance that is ultimately not of this world.  We are citizens who have a responsibility to work together – for this world and the world to come.

Furthermore, the King will come at the end of time to call His faithful people home to heaven.  We believe that the world will end on a future, unknown day (and once again, let me stress it is an UNKNOWN date…).  This feast reminds us that in the end we belong to one home or the other, one Lord or another.

Finally, to say that Christ is our King reminds us that all our power, strength, hope, and direction come from Him.  The skills and talents we possess are from the King (who made us).  The forgiveness we cherish is from the King (who died for us).  The life of the Holy Spirit which sustains us was sent by the King (who asked the Father on our behalf).

Therefore, to claim Christ as our King is to make a statement about who we are.  As followers of this King we offer our lives in service to the one who is our Lord.  We make this King our first priority in all things, and we look upon Jesus Christ as both the beginning and end of our existence.

This is a good time for us to search and prepare our hearts.  As this Church year comes to an end we begin to make ourselves ready for the Lord who comes to us, that he might find us alert and watchful for his arrival.  May we renew our allegiance to Christ our King so that he will rule us with mercy, grace, and love.

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Archive of Fr. Andrew’s Podcasts


The Solemnity of Christ the King of the Universe. Catholic Inspiration

Three Great Things

Fr. Andrew’s Homily Podcast

Mass Readings – The Solemnity of Christ the King of the Universe

He is the King of Kings, and Lord of Lords…and yet he came into our world to teach us about his heavenly Father with compassion and tenderness.  May we draw near to his Divine Mercy, and say the words of the Good Thief, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom!”

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Note: this image (above and below) is the great icon of Christ the King located in the main apse of the Cathedral in Superior.  The pictures don’t do it justice, so if you are ever near the shores of Lake Superior, come and pray with us and see it for yourself.

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Christ the King of the Universe…remember me!

good-friday

Study: Consider a crucial time when you asked and received help.  How did it feel?

Pray: Is there anything that is keeping you from receiving God’s grace?  Ask the Lord for the courage to ask!

Serve: Do you know someone who is struggling to receive mercy or forgiveness?  How can you help them grow in faith?

Mass Readings – The Solemnity of Christ the King of the Universe

The Gospel image is both brutal and tender, revealing God’s saving grace and mercy in the midst of the Passion of the Cross.  The good thief (who tradition names Dismas) calls upon the Lord saying, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.”

How these words speak to my heart!  In a single phrase the King of Kings and Lord of Lords becomes approachable as Christ bridges Heaven and Earth, crushes Hell and invites us to enter into eternal life: “Today you will be with me in paradise!”

The good thief shows both humility and boldness.  He knows his sins, and yet he speaks to the Lord with a gentle conviction, asking for a grace that he cannot achieve on his own.  His trust inspires us as we acknowledge our own sins and draw near to the one whose death and resurrection saves and sets us free.

May these words strengthen our faith as we call upon the Lord.  May they help us to seek Christ before all else as we repent and call upon God’s grace.  May we truly say:

Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom!

 


Our Lord Jesus Christ, the King of the Universe

Pantocrator

Study:  Recall a time when you carried out a difficult command.  What gave you strength?

Pray:  Is there a difficult situation facing you right now?  Draw near to Christ in the Eucharist for wisdom and courage.

Serve:  Actions speak louder than words…so how can your actions today show others that Christ is your King?

Readings for the Feast of Our Lord Jesus Christ, the King of the Universe

Fr. Andrew’s Homily Podcast

We conclude the Church’s liturgical calendar with this Feast in honor of our Lord.  The title is one that speaks to a role that appears in history, literature, and culture:  the KING.

Here are some common key points to remember:

  • The King is recognized as ruler
  • The King’s power is acknowledged
  • The King’s decrees are to be obeyed

Sounds simple, right?  So how do we apply these concepts to Jesus?  Consider this:

  • If Christ is the ruler of my life, then all my words and actions must align with Him.
  • I turn to Christ for strength in my moments of powerlessness.
  • I act on Christ’s commands, obeying His teaching and precepts.

Practically, I suggest that we focus this week on three key commandments that Christ gave us:

  1. Forgive one another.  Reread chapter 18 in Matthew’s gospel for a review.
  2. Come to Mass. Check out chapter 6 in John’s gospel, or Mt. 26:26-28.
  3. Love one another.  Try John 15:12-17 for a refresher!

Remember: the King commands us to forgive, receive Him in the Eucharist, and love one another.  These are not suggestions, or helpful hints when we have free time!  These are commands…and as we acknowledge that Jesus is our King we also know that we can draw near to the Lord for the strength and wisdom we need to carry them out.

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This icon of Christ Pantocrator is on loan to the Cathedral of Christ the King from Fr. Andrew Ricci.  “Pantocrator” may be literally translated into “Ruler of All” or “Almighty” and it is an ancient way of depicting Jesus.


The Feast of Christ the King

Christ the King

Study: Recall a time when you recognized God as the center of your life; a time when you hung on to faith – perhaps because other things were struggling.

Pray: Call upon the Lord to rule and guide your heart.

Serve:  What is the King’s command for you today?  How is the Lord directing you to help and serve another?

The Feast of Christ the King Readings

Fr. Andrew’s Homily

The Feast of Christ the King brings the Church calendar year to a close.  Next week begins Advent, and we will start a new liturgical year with the cycle of “B” readings in the Lectionary for Mass.

Why do we end the year with the notion of Christ the King?  Why do we place this feast here?  What’s the point?

The feast has several levels of meaning.  By calling Christ our King we are making a statement that Jesus is the Lord of our lives.  It means that we place Christ first, and that we serve the Lord Jesus with the allegiance of our hearts, minds, and bodies.  We belong to Christ, who rules us.

In addition, to claim Christ as our King means that we are members of his kingdom.  Through our baptism we are called to the community of faith, the Church, and we possess an inheritance that is ultimately not of this world.  We are citizens who have a responsibility to work together – for this world and the world to come.

Furthermore, the King will come at the end of time to call His faithful people home to heaven.  We believe that the world will end on a future, unknown day (and once again, let me stress it is an UNKNOWN date…).  This feast reminds us that in the end we belong to one home or the other, one Lord or another.

Finally, to say that Christ is our King reminds us that all our power, strength, hope, and direction come from Him.  The skills and talents we possess are from the King (who made us).  The forgiveness we cherish is from the King (who died for us).  The life of the Holy Spirit which sustains us was sent by the King (who asked the Father on our behalf).

Therefore, to claim Christ as our King is to make a statement about who we are.  As followers of this King we offer our lives in service to the one who is our Lord.  We make this King our first priority in all things, and we look upon Jesus Christ as both the beginning and end of our existence.

This is a good time for us to search and prepare our hearts.  As this Church year comes to an end we begin to make ourselves ready for the Lord who comes to us, that he might find us alert and watchful for his arrival.  May we renew our allegiance to Christ our King so that he will rule us with mercy, grace, and love.


34th Sunday of the Year – Christ the King

Jesus Christ

Study:  Consider people you know who have been good role models of leadership.  What qualities did they possess that you admired?

Pray:  Is there a major decision or choice in your life that requires guidance.  Ask the Lord for direction.

Serve:  Is there someone you know who is searching for meaning and purpose?  Is there some way that you can help them find their path in life?

34th Sunday Readings

The Feast of Christ the King brings the Church calendar year to a close.  Next week begins Advent, and we will start a new liturgical year with the cycle of “A” readings in the Lectionary for Mass.

Why do we end the year with the notion of Christ the King?  Why do we place this feast here?  What’s the point?

The feast has several levels of meaning.  By calling Christ our King we are making a statement that Jesus is the Lord of our lives.  It means that we place Christ first, and that we serve the Lord Jesus with the allegiance of our hearts, minds, and bodies.  We belong to Christ, who rules us.

In addition, to claim Christ as our King means that we are members of his kingdom.  Through our baptism we are called to the community of faith, the Church, and we possess an inheritance that is ultimately not of this world.  We are citizens who have a responsibility to work together – for this world and the world to come.

Furthermore, the King will come at the end of time to call His faithful people home to heaven.  We believe that the world will end on a future, unknown day (and once again, let me stress it is an UNKNOWN date…).  This feast reminds us that in the end we belong to one home or the other, one Lord or another.

Finally, to say that Christ is our King reminds us that all our power, strength, hope, and direction come from Him.  The skills and talents we possess are from the King (who made us).  The forgiveness we cherish is from the King (who died for us).  The life of the Holy Spirit which sustains us was sent by the King (who asked the Father on our behalf).

Therefore, to claim Christ as our King is to make a statement about who we are.  As followers of this King we offer our lives in service to the one who is our Lord.  We make this King our first priority in all things, and we look upon Jesus Christ as both the beginning and end of our existence.

This is a good time for us to search and prepare our hearts.  As this Church year comes to an end we begin to make ourselves ready for the Lord who comes to us, that he might find us alert and watchful for his arrival.  May we renew our allegiance to Christ our King so that he will rule us with mercy, grace, and love.