Tag Archives: trust in the Lord

19th Sunday of the Year: Jesus walks on the water

Study:  Recall a moment in life when you were doubtful or afraid.  How did you face it?

Pray:  Ask the Lord for the strength and wisdom to face doubts and fears.

Serve:  Is there someone in your life who is struggling with doubts or fears?  How might you help them?

Mass Readings – 19th Sunday of the Year

This Gospel story (Matthew 14:22-33) follows immediately after the feeding of the 5000.  Here’s a quick recap:

* Jesus hears of the death of John the Baptist
* Jesus seeks solitude in a deserted place
* The crowds find Jesus; he ministers to them
* Jesus feeds the hungry with fishes & bread

After the people have eaten, the Lord makes the disciples get into a boat while he dismisses the crowd.  The following events occur:
1.  The disciples are in the boat on the water
2.  Jesus goes up the mountain to pray alone
3.  The wind and the waves are getting strong
4.  Late at night Jesus comes on the water
5.  Seeing Jesus, the disciples are terrified
6.  Jesus, “Take courage, it is I, do not be afraid!”
7.  Peter to Jesus “Command me to come to you.”
8.  Peter goes to Jesus, is frightened and sinks
9.  Jesus rescues Peter “Why did you doubt?”
10. The disciples:  “Truly you are the Son of God!”

Note that Matthew’s Gospel differs from Mark’s account (6:45-52) in three ways:
1.  The dialogue between Jesus and Peter
2.  Peter walking (sort of) on the water
3.  Confession of faith – Jesus the Son of God

The story speaks of Peter’s desire to follow Jesus, even as it clearly shows his human weakness.  Peter tries, fails, and calls upon Jesus to save him in his need.  As a result, the disciples recognize the Son of God in their midst.

The early Church took this passage to heart.  Like the boat tossed on the waters, early Christians knew all too well the dangers of faith – risking their lives to follow Jesus.  Like Peter, they had their moments of weakness; like Peter, they called upon the Lord in their need.

We can see ourselves in this situation as well.  There are times when we desperately want a strong and steadfast faith; we seek the Lord and desire to follow His path for our lives.  Yet we are also aware of our limitations, failures, and fears.  May we, like Peter, call upon Jesus in our need; may we trust in the Lord’s strength and love to save us.

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Archive of Fr. Andrew’s Podcasts


Daily Mass: Divine teaching, human weakness. Catholic Inspiration

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Mass Readings – Tuesday of the 7th Week of the Year

As the Lord attempts to teach the disciples he catches them arguing about who is the greatest.  His response: to set before them a child…that as they welcome the innocent and vulnerable into their midst, they welcome Him.

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Archive of Fr. Andrew’s Podcasts


33rd Sunday of the Year: When the tough times come.

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Study: Consider a time when you felt paralyzed by fear.  What helped you to act in a healthy way?

Pray: Do you have a situation where you are struggling for the right words to day?  Ask the Lord for the wisdom to speak.

Serve:  Is someone struggling in your life right now?  How can you help them persevere?

Mass Readings – 33rd Sunday of the Year

In the Gospel Jesus responds to the questions of those who are wondering when the destruction of the Temple will happen.  Through the course of his dialogue three key points surface:

  1. Do not fear.
  2. Trust in the Lord for the wisdom to speak.
  3. Persevere!

These points are crucial – they touch so much of our daily lives!  How often have we experienced moments of fear, or searched for just the right words to say, or looked for strength when we felt weak?  This advice is solid, practical, and helpful.

And yet while we may very well find ourselves nodding in agreement, we also know that this is often hard to do.  Fear can suffocate us and manipulate how we speak and act; sometimes we speak and live to regret what we said or how we said it; and there are days when we wonder why are we doing what we do.

The Lord understands.  Christ faced his fears in the Garden of Gethsemane; he spoke to the hearts of those who persecuted him, even as he persevered on the way to Calvary.

Today we examine our lives for vulnerable spots where we are weak and prone to temptation.  It is here that we call upon the Lord – to face our fears, trust in God’s wisdom, and keep going with a strength that is greater than our own.


Daily Mass: Proclaim the Good News. Catholic Inspiration

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Fr. Andrew’s Daily Mass Homily Podcast

Mass Readings – Thursday of the 14th Week of the Year

Jesus sends out the Twelve Apostles to proclaim that the Kingdom of Heaven is at hand.  Their message is accompanied by powerful works of healing as they trust in the Lord for grace and strength.  May we do the same in our lives today.


Daily Mass: Fighting the Battle

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Fr. Andrew’s Daily Mass Homily Podcast

Mass Readings – Tuesday of the 12th Week of the Year

Hezekiah calls upon the Lord when the people of Israel were in grave peril.  May we face the battles in our lives with the same conviction, calling upon the Lord for the strength, courage, and wisdom we need to carry on.

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And if you are in need of a little extra prayer support, call on St. Michael!

Prayer to St. Michael, the Archangel


29th Sunday of the Year – The Cup of Suffering

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Study:  Consider an experience of suffering in your life.  What lessons did you learn?  How did you change and grow?

Pray:  Many people carry heavy crosses every day…pray for them that they find the strength and grace they need.

Serve:  Many people carry heavy crosses every day…how can you help them?

29th Sunday of the Year Readings

Fr. Andrew’s Homily Podcast

The readings today weave together around some common themes:

  • 1st Reading – The Servant who suffers to ransom others
  • Psalm – We trust in the Lord’s mercy
  • 2nd Reading – Jesus, tested in every way, sympathizes with our weaknesses
  • Gospel – Christ came to serve and offer his life…inviting us to do the same

Let’s start with Jesus.  The Lord’s mission included not only teaching and healing, but was most clearly articulated in his death and resurrection for the life of the world.  Christ died for our sins – taking our place by his suffering on the Cross for the evil we have done.  His resurrection blazes a trail for us that leads to Heaven.

It is crucial to note that suffering is the path, not the goal.  God the Father did not choose Jesus to suffer out of a desire for pain, but to bridge the gap between the human and divine.  The Lord is the High Priest whose suffering draws near to a wounded and broken humanity.  Like us in all things but sin, Jesus embraces us as he stretched out his hands on the Cross.

The victory of the Resurrection reveals suffering as the doorway, a path that when taken purges and cleanses, through which Christ has passed to break the bonds of sin and death.  Suffering does not end in suffering; it leads to a freedom in Christ that is filled with grace, mercy, and peace.

This message has elements of consolation and challenge for us today.  The consolation?  We look to Christ for our redemption – turning to the Lord whose saving death and resurrection give us eternal life.

The challenge?  We are called to face our suffering, recognizing in the crosses of our lives the path of redemption that God sets before us.  In other words, we drink from the cup of Christ’s suffering – but we do it with conviction, faith, and hope.

The suffering we face today is part of our transformation as disciples.  We engage the challenges of this life, not because we welcome pain, but because we see God’s hand at work in our struggles to purify our hearts and desires.  Through this process we offer our lives, following the example of Jesus Christ to bring life to those in our midst.

Drink from the cup.  Consider the sufferings of today as an offering to the Lord – given out of love that our lives might be transformed into the image and likeness of Christ!

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La crucifixion, Philippe de Champaigne; 1644-1646, 800 x 600 pixels.